Apr 14, 2020 by Stuart Bentley

Back Pain Myth 1 – Moving will make my back pain worse

The Chartered Society of Physiotherapists (CSP) have produced a series of evidence based myth busters to tackle the common myths surrounding back pain.

The CSP are busting myths about back pain and reinforcing what the latest evidence says is best for your back.

Myth 1 – Moving will make my back pain worse 

Although it is true that some movements can be uncomfortable when you have back pain, it is well established that returning to movement and work as soon as you are able, is better for recovery and preventing recurrence than bed rest.

This is not a new concept by any means, but it is an unfortunate misconception which is continues to endure, due in part, to the complex nature of pain.

#MotionIsLotion

References 

Balagu, F. et al., 2012. Non-specific low back pain. The Lancet, 379(9814), pp.482–491.

Darlow, B. et al., 2015. Easy to Harm, Hard to Heal. Spine, (August 2016), p.1.

Picavet, H.S.J., Vlaeyen, J.W.S. & Schouten, J.S.A.G., 2002. Pain catastrophizing and kinesiophobia: Predictors of chronic low back pain. American Journal of Epidemiology, 156(11), pp.1028–1034.

Pincus, T. et al., 2002. A systematic review of psychological factors as predictors of chronicity/disability in prospective cohorts of low back pain. Spine (Phila Pa 1976), 27(5), pp.E109–20. 

Swinkels-Meewisse, I.E.J. et al., 2006. Acute low back pain: Pain-related fear and pain catastrophizing influence physical performance and perceived disability. Pain, 120(1-2), pp.36–43.

Waddell, G., 1993. Simple low back pain: rest or active exercise? Annals of the rheumatic diseases, 52(5), p.317. 

Wynne-Jones, G. et al., 2014. Absence from work and return to work in people with back pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Occupational and environmental medicine, 71(6), pp.448–56.

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